Help Us Design a Better Root Barrier

 

Root barriers have somewhat been relegated to the side what with all of the hullabaloo about the Silva Cell. This is a little sad to me, since root barriers have been an effective tool used to help maintain the integrity of sidewalks and other hardscapes for over 30 years. They are also an important tool to direct roots downward when using the Silva Cell system.

Deep Root is the original creator of the root barrier (also called a tree root guide).  All of our products, including our entire line of root barriers, are made in the United States. It sounds corny, but we pride ourselves on innovating and manufacturing the highest quality products (awww!).

Of course, we have competition, but we happen to think our product is the best one available for a number of reasons. Among other things, our flagship universal tree root guides (UB 18-2 and UB 24-2) have several features that set us apart:

  • Patented ground lock tabs to prevent lifting by tree roots.
  • Patented double top edge for strength, safety, appearance and root overgrowth protection.
  • Instant assembly with our Zipper Joining system.
  • Rounded edges for safety.
  • Copolymer Polypropylene.
  • 50% Post-consumer recycled plastic.
  • Injection-molded to ensure a consistent fit and finish.
  • IS0 9002 certified, which ensures the highest quality control standards of manufacturing.

Because we sell through a network of distributors, we don’t get a chance to talk directly with most of our root barrier customers. Sometimes we wish we had more contact with them — these are the people using the products day in and day out, and they always provide valuable feedback for us.

To that end, we would like to hear from you about what type of green innovations would be useful for dealing with the interface of tree roots and hardscapes. No idea is too far-fetched! For example, maybe we look toward creating a barrier that no longer use plastic and biodegrade after a certain number of years. Leave your ideas in the Comments section below, on our Facebook page, or email us at info@deeproot.com.

In future posts we’ll discuss the history of the root barrier, uses, and applications, and peruse some of the more interesting projects.

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